[Ontbirds] Quinte Area Bird Report for week ending Thursday, May 25, 2006

Terry Sprague tsprague at kos.net
Thu May 25 19:29:22 EDT 2006


WEEKLY BIRD REPORT FROM PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY AND THE QUINTE AREA FOR THE 
WEEK ENDING Thursday, May 25, 2006


There's no doubt that Prince Edward Point is the place to be these days The 
star bird of  the week was a second year male LAZULI BUNTING which was 
trapped in net 6B on  the 23rd May. This bird was well photographed after 
having been banded and was  seen by all those present. When released, the 
bird flew into the bushes behind  the banding hut and was not seen again 
despite being well looked for. This is  a new species for the Observatory 
and also for Prince Edward County, bringing the list of confirmed species 
for Prince Edward County, to 342.

Now back to the birds in general. The DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are 
increasing as more come in to False Duck to breed, up to a thousand can now 
be seen  in a day. The HORNED GREBE first seen late last week was last seen 
on the  20th, also the LONG-TAILED DUCKS have dwindled to just a handful 
now.  In the  harbour today was a female HOODED MERGANSER. Three 
BROAD-WINGED HAWKS flew over in  a kettle of TURKEY VULTURES on the 23rd and 
PEREGRINE FALCONS have been seen  on the 21st and 23rd. The only BLACK TERN 
so far of the spring was seen  feeding offshore on the 23rd, although others 
have been seen elsewhere in the County with the first observed at Point 
Petre on May 16th. BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO'S can be heard occasionally, but  are 
not reliable yet. A RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER was seen on the 22nd around the 
Observatory. The first EASTERN WOOD PEWEE was singing on the 19th and 
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS returned on the 21st, LEAST FLYCATCHERS are 
becoming common  and 60 were observed on the 24th, with 6 GREAT-CRESTED 
FLYCATCHERS being  present that day as well. Today there was an OLIVE-SIDED 
FLYCATCHER near the  harbour. Single COMMON RAVENS were seen on the 21st and 
23rd over the Observatory.  On the 24th a small resurgence occurred in the 
numbers seen of RED-BREASTED  NUTHATCHES (10) and RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS 
(25). A few thrushes arrived today with  counts of 20 VEERY, 3 GRAY-CHEEKED, 
a late HERMIT and 50 SWAINSON'S being  counted.

A BLUE-WINGED WARBLER was trapped on the 19th and a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER 
on the 23rd. A large arrival occurred on the 24th with the following warbler 
numbers being seen, 15 TENNESSEE, an ORANGE-CROWNED, 60 NASHVILLE, 6 
NORTHERN  PARULAS, 55 YELLOW, 35 CHESTNUT-SIDED, over 300 MAGNOLIAS, 25 
BLACK-THROATED BLUE,  75 YELLOW-RUMPED, 70 BLACK-THROATED GREENS, 70 
BLACKBURNIAN, 50 BAY-BREASTED, 15  BLACK-AND-WHITES, 40 AMERICAN REDSTARTS, 
15 WILSON'S and 5 CANADAS. A CAPE  MAY WARBLER was seen on the 19th. 
WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS have all but gone now,  but a few WHITE-CROWNED 
SPARROWS are hanging on. An EVENING GROSBEAK was seen  on the 23rd and was 
seen again on the 24th. And finally, a female HOODED WARBLER  was trapped 
today and was the second Hooded Warbler of the spring. Don't  forget the 
Observatory is holding its AGM at Lake-on-the -Mountain on the 3rd June.

The Prince Edward County Birding Festival wrapped up on May 22nd. Despite 
overcast skies, most events were quite successful, with birders there from 
across Ontario and Quebec, as well as from the United States, and two from 
Norway. There were 9 morning bird walks at Prince Edward Point during the 
week, and on Sunday, with rain falling first thing in the morning, breaking 
into full sun within a couple of hours, birders were met with clouds of 
migrants in one location in the Point Traverse Woods. Without moving a step, 
over 20 species of warblers were counted, along with all the common vireo 
species. A CERULEAN WARBLER was among those present. A total of 26 species 
of warblers were present in the general area that day, including the first 
BLACKPOLL WARBLER of the season.

The Bucknell's Slough along Wesley Acres Road, south of Bloomfield, 
continues to offer a good variety of wetland species, quite unusual for this 
site, as this low lying field is usually pumped dry by now for crops. On 
Wednesday, there was a pair of REDHEADS, BLACK DUCK, BLUE-WINGED TEAL, a 
single DUNLIN, SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, LESSER 
YELLOWLEGS and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. BLACK TERNS were also seen in the 
area. Along the shore of the Bay of Quinte, at George's Road, east of 
Northport, a GREAT EGRET was present during one recent weekend. At Muscote 
Bay, CASPIAN TERNS are still present over the bay and an OSPREY has been 
present for several days, believed to be nesting on a platform along 
Demorestville Creek. Another pair of OSPREYS located this past week atop a 
high light standard in a soccer field at Belleville's Zwick's Island Park. 
These appear to be favoured sites of this species in recent years and there 
is much to be learned about the dangers of such locations due to the heat 
from the powerful lights. If anyone has any knowledge with respect to the 
heat factor of these locations and what measures have been taken, or of any 
mishaps that have occurred,  I would be interested in hearing about it.

Other interesting sightings include continued observations of COMMON RAVENS 
in the county, two SNOW GEESE and an AMERICAN PIPIT observed just south of 
Picton, and a RING-NECKED PHEASANT that has been seen by many travellers 
along County Road 13 in the South Bay area.

And that's it for this week from Prince Edward County and the Quinte area. 
Our thanks to David Okines of the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory, 
Lloyd Paul, Bill Hogg, Margaret Kirk, Barry Pinsky, Nancy Fox, Silvia 
Botnick, Fred Chandler, Marilyn Holland-Foster, Henri Garand, Frank Artes & 
Carolyn Barnes, John & Margaret Moore, and Rosemary Smith for their 
contributions to this week's report. This report will be updated on 
Thursday, June 1st. Bird sightings may be forwarded any time to 
tsprague at kos.net before the Thursday 6:00 p.m. deadline. This report also 
appears for a week on the NatureStuff website, where this week's photo by 
Terry Sprague  is of Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory bird bander David 
Okines as he concentrates on the Baillie Bridathon.

Terry Sprague
Prince Edward County
tsprague at kos.net
www.naturestuff.net 




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