[Ontbirds]Quinte Area Bird Report for week ending October 05, 2006

Terry Sprague tsprague at kos.net
Thu Oct 5 19:30:06 EDT 2006


WEEKLY BIRD REPORT FROM PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY AND THE QUINTE AREA FOR THE 
WEEK ENDING  Thursday, October 05, 2006


This evening's report is a mixed bag of observations, confirming that birds 
are still on the move as the summer season is on the wane, and cooler 
weather in the offing. As with our usual custom, we will start with the 
Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory Report. Of course, this south-eastern 
tip of the County is where it's happening and where much attention is 
routinely focussed during both spring and fall migrations. With so many 
observers down there taking in the fall migration, and bird banding underway 
every day of the week, it would be unusual indeed if any birds that appear 
at this "little Point Pelee of eastern  Ontario" could possibly escape 
detection.

 The DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS roosting offshore can occasionally number 
8000 now, while a few, up to 10, COMMON LOONS are moving daily. Three MUTE 
SWANS flew over the woods on the 29th, WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS are starting to 
appear regularly now and 45 were sitting offshore on the 4th. Three 
BUFFLEHEAD flew past on the 29th and 2 - 3 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS are being 
seen regularly offshore. TURKEY VULTURES are moving and peaks of 140 were 
seen on the 29th and 80 flew over today. BALD EAGLES are still being seen 
every couple of days but very few raptors are passing over, a female 
PEREGRINE FALCON flew along the harbour on the 4th. A GREAT-HORNED OWL can 
be heard at night and NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS are starting to trickle 
through. Twenty-five were trapped on the night of the 29th and the fall 
total so far stands at 41, a grey phase EASTERN SCREECH OWL was banded on 
the 29th. The occasional RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD can still be seen with 
the last bird on the 30th.

YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS continue to pass through in good numbers with 
peaks of 12 on the 29th and 10 on the 2nd. A PILEATED WOODPECKER was in the 
woods on the 30th and a late TRAILL'S FLYCATCHER was seen on the 30th and 
that day also had 3 EASTERN WOOD PEWEES and 5 EASTERN PHOEBE'S in the area. 
BLUE JAY numbers are starting to pick up and 1000 were seen flying over on 
the 3rd, with 1200 seen the next day, whilst a COMMON RAVEN flew over today. 
Up to 55 BROWN CREEPERS can be seen in a day flitting through the woods, and 
WINTER WRENS are reaching their peak with up to 20 birds seen daily. 
Kinglets are really starting to be noticeable now, and on the 30th, 250 
GOLDEN-CROWNED and 160 RUBY-CROWNED were present and 200 RUBY-CROWNED were 
present today. Two EASTERN BLUEBIRDS flew over on the 29th and GRAY-CHEEKED 
and SWAINSON'S THRUSHES have nearly finished moving with just the odd bird 
being recorded now, but as they subside, HERMIT THRUSHES are starting to 
pick up with a peak of 30 seen today.

A flock of 250 EUROPEAN STARLINGS flying over high on the 4th were 
definitely migrants. The first ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER of the fall was seen 
on the 29th and other singles were trapped on the 3rd and 5th. NORTHERN 
PARULAS were trapped on the 29th and today, and up to 20 BLACK-THROATED BLUE 
WARBLERS are present daily, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS are slowly moving with up 
to 60 being seen in a day. Two BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS were seen on the 29th 
as were two BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS and six BLACKPOLL WARBLERS. Fifteen 
species of warblers were seen during the week and they include a late 
OVENBIRD which was trapped on the 2nd. Migrant SONG SPARROWS have started to 
move through and WHITE-THROATED and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS have increased 
with a peak of 50 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and 30 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, 
both seen on the 1st. DARK-EYED JUNCOS are increasing as the season 
progresses and up to 25 have been seen and a "pink-sided" sub-species 
(central Rockies) was trapped on the 30th.

The famous feeder along Glenora Road, east of Picton, added to its laurels 
this week as probably the best bird feeder in the entire county, by adding 
yet another species to its guest list. A juvenile RED-HEADED WOODPECKER 
arrived September 29th, feasting on suet and sunflower seeds, and was last 
seen on October 1st.

Several have reported exciting numbers of birds around their premises. Not 
surprisingly, most have been both RUBY-CROWNED and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS. 
At least two BLUE-HEADED VIREOS made their debut in a Carrying Place back 
yard, and a careless BROWN CREEPER stunned itself when it collided with a 
window at a West Lake home - the same house where a well documented Cave 
Swallow (only two records for the County) had a similar incident last year, 
in November. A resident east of Milford was surprised to see 3 NORTHERN 
MOCKINGBIRDS land in a tree near Jackson's Falls Road this past week, 
followed by a PILEATED WOODPECKER one other day. WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS on 
many lawns and bird feeders have been numerous as this species continues its 
southward migration. Others have noted DARK-EYED JUNCOS at their feeders, a 
reminder of wintry days to come. But no more so than an early AMERICAN TREE 
SPARROW that showed up at an Allisonville feeder this morning, where an 
EASTERN TOWHEE is also present.

Observers who have wandered further afield, have noted flocks of AMERICAN 
ROBINS, blackbirds of various species, EUROPEAN STARLINGS, and certainly no 
dearth of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. One observer at Prince Edward Point on the 
2nd estimated the number to be about 225, the most at any time he had ever 
seen. And they weren't alone either, as all indications pointed toward a 
major fallout of birds at Prince Edward Point that morning when he arrived 
at 7:30 a.m. Included in his impressive tally were 125 DARK-EYED JUNCOS, 45 
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, and 50 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, most of which were 
checked off along the roadside. His total for the day was 70 species. 
Looking up, way up, he also noted a swirling kettle of 48 TURKEY VULTURES, 
and also recorded YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, EASTERN WOOD PEWEE, WARBLING 
VIREO, RED-EYED VIREO, BLUE-HEADED VIREO (4), GOLDEN-CROWNED and 
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH, NASHVILLE 
WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER and PALM 
WARBLER. Among the 7 species of sparrows seen was a LINCOLN'S SPARROW. Not 
satisfied with his results, he located 5 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS near Black 
River, and found a DUNLIN and a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER at Sandbanks, and a 
late CASPIAN TERN at Wellington, where he also ticked off NORTHERN PINTAIL, 
AMERICAN WIGEON, REDHEAD, LESSER SCAUP and both HORNED and PIED-BILLED 
GREBES. Tired me out just reading it!


Terry Sprague
Prince Edward County
tsprague at kos.net
www.naturestuff.net 




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