[Ontbirds] Franklin's Gull, Nelson Sharp-tailed Sparrow and Snow Goose, Dundas Marsh Hamilton

Cheryl Edgecombe cheryle29 at cogeco.ca
Tue Oct 9 10:42:47 EDT 2007


This morning, catching up on being away from the Hamilton area this past
weekend, I made a quick trip out to Dundas Marsh from 8-9:00 a.m..  On my
way out I went into Paradise Pond which is the large dried up pond on the
right hand side of the trail about half way out to the main marsh.  While I
was watching the gulls fly over here a single Snow Goose flew over my head
in the mist.  Along the edge of the pond there were many Swamp and Song
Sparrows but I had excellent looks at 1 Nelson's Sharp-tail and I believe
there was a second one with it.  I did not have to thrash through the reeds
but just waited along the far end where all the low vegetation and Beggar's
tick is and it popped up along the edge.

Out on the mud flat, I had 2 Franklin's Gulls feeding on the mud.
Fortunately, I did not have to go out the entire trail but just scoped them
from the first opening you see into the marsh not too far past the dried up
pond.

Wear rubber boots/rain clothing, its a bit saugy out there today.

Cheers,
Cheryl Edgecombe
cheryle29 at cogeco.ca

Dundas Marsh (The Willows) - Take Main St. (in Hamilton) West to Cootes
Drive (at McMaster University), down hill (north) to a bridge over the
creek. Watch the parking regulations - the best way is to continue 200 m. to
Olympic Drive, then u-turn back to the bridge on the south side of Cootes
Drive. Take the trail on the side of the bridge closest to  McMaster,  as
the old bridge has been removed. Walk along the creek which goes out to what
is called the Willows. If you follow this trail, the creek is on your LEFT
side. Half way down the trail, there is a dried up pond on the right,
continue on the trail and at the end of the Willows, there are extensive
mudflats.  Please take caution as there is poison ivy along the trail,
stumps/trees to step over and the mud may be a bit sticky in places out on
the mudflat.



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