[Ontbirds] OFO field trip: West-end Ottawa, May 30, 2010

Ladouceur, Bernie Bernie.Ladouceur at cra-arc.gc.ca
Mon May 31 18:42:35 EDT 2010


Fourteen birders turned up to search for some of west-end Ottawa's breeding bird specialties and to catch what movement there was along the Ottawa River. The entire morning was overcast, not so great for breeding birds but not bad for bird movement.

We made a quick stop at the west end of Andrew Haydon Park along the Ottawa River, where we searched in vain for a Red Knot that had been reported the nigh before. We had a single Dunlin, a Semipalmated Plover and 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers.

>From there it was off to the Dunrobin area. Our first stop was at Constance Creek along the Thomas Dolan Parkway, just north of the Dunrobin road.  Highlights were Least Bittern, American Bittern, Virginia Rail and Common Moorhen (all heard only).

Next we drove south along the Thomas Dolan Parkway up onto the Carp Ridge, an outcrop of the Canadian Shield. The ridge is the only location for breeding Golden-winged Warblers on the Ontario side of the Ottawa-Gatineau region, and by far the most dependable area for Eastern Towhee in the entire region.

We stopped for Golden-winged Warbler first. One bird sang persistently but just didn't want show itself, except for the quickest views in flight.

We had better luck with the towhees, with most participants getting a pretty good look at a male. A few people also managed to get a look at a Field Sparrow. A number of other breeding species were noted, but the morning was definitely quieter than usual.

We headed for Constance Bay. On our way, we made a stop along Dunrobin road, just before the Constance Bay exit. Here we had excellent views Eastern Meadowlark and Bobolink, and pretty good looks at 2 Upland Sandpipers.

We then headed to a small burnt area in Constance Bay for what may be the last Red-headed Woodpeckers in the entire Ottawa-Gatineau region. With a lot of patience, we were rewarded with an excellent look at a Red-headed Woodpecker, a lifer for two of the participants. Nearby, we found a male Common Golden-eye along the Ottawa River.

We headed back to the west end of Andrew Haydon Park. The highlight was a Caspian Tern, rare in Ottawa. Also putting in an appearance were a Black-crowned Night Heron, a Common Merganser and a Hooded Merganser.

Our final stop was Britannia Point to look at the action over the Deschênes Rapids. There were about 15 Bonaparte's Gulls and 7 Ruddy Turnstones, which landed on the exposed rocks in the rapids. This was in addition to the hundreds of nesting Ring-billed Gulls, a number of Double-crested Cormorants and a Black-crowned Night Heron, two species that have only recently begun to breed in the area. (No Arctic Terns this time, but the next few days look promising.)

Our final tally was 77 species.

Reported by Bernie Ladouceur

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Common Golden-ye
Common Merganser
Hooded Merganser
Ruffed Grouse
Wild Turkey
Double-crested Cormorants
American Bittern
Least Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Osprey
Virginia Rail
Common Moorhen
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Upland Sandpiper
Ruddy Turnstone
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Dunlin
Wilson's Snipe
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Caspian Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Chimney Swift
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Alder Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
House Wren
Veery
American Robin
Gray Catbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Golden-winged Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Ovenbird
Common Yellowthroat
Scarlet Tanager
Eastern Towhee
Field Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch



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