[Ontbirds] Kingston Area Birds for the Period Feb 10 to Feb 16, 2012

Mark Conboy mconboy at lakeheadu.ca
Fri Feb 17 09:24:31 EST 2012


Two rare species were found in the eastern reaches of Prince Edward
County this past week: a MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD was along Long Point Road
and 2 HARLEQUIN DUCKS were off the end of Prince Edward Point. Details
below. Winter finch numbers remain low to almost non-existent (except
for AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES) while waxwing numbers continue to climb.
Open water predominates on Lake Ontario but the backcountry remains
mostly frozen so waterbirds are concentrated in the southern part of
our region.

City of Kingston
Cataraqui Bay had GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON, AMERICAN BLACK DUCK,
REDHEAD, both SCAUPS, 1 RING-NECKED DUCK, COMMON GOLDENEYE, HOODED
MERGANSER, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, COMMON MERGANSER and AMERICAN COOT.
Two PEREGRINE FALCONS can be seen with some regularity around the
Queen’s University campus and Kingston General Hospital. A pair of
EASTERN SCREECH-OWLS was singing in City Park. A CAROLINA WREN was
singing on Collingwood Street.

Amherst Island
No big surprises from the island this week but birds there did include
MUTE SWAN, 13 TUNDRA SWANS, GADWALL, AMERICAN BLACK DUCK, several
hundred REDHEAD, several thousand GREATER SCAUP, 1 LESSER SCAUP,
LONG-TAILED DUCK, all three MERGANSERS, 4 RING-NECKED PHEASANTS, 5
BALD EAGLES, 15 NORTHERN HARRIERS, RED-TAILED HAWK, 6 ROUGH-LEGGED
HAWKS, 2 AMERICAN KESTRELS, 4 SNOWY OWLS, SHORT-EARED OWL, 1
RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, 2 NORTHERN SHRIKES, 3 COMMON RAVENS, 1 HORNED
LARK, 1 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, 6 GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS, 44 AMERICAN
ROBINS, SNOW BUNTING and 1 RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. One red-tailed hawk
was seen hunkered down on a nest yesterday – at least a month earlier
than expected if the bird was in fact already incubating.

Bath
Finkle Shore Park had GADWALL, AMERICAN BLACK DUCK, 650 REDHEAD, 2700
GREATER SCAUP, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE and 1 AMERICAN PIPIT (the
first reported for the Kingston Region this year).

Bedford Mills
The hardy FIELD SPARROW and RUSTY BLACKBIRD continue to visit a feeder
south of the hamlet. Other sightings in the area include 1 AMERICAN
ROBIN, 50 BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS and 1 PURPLE FINCH.

Charleston Lake Provincial Park
HORNED LARKS were along Mountain Road. A small flock of BOHEMIAN
WAXWINGS flew over the “summit” of Blue Mountain.

Opinicon Road
Up to 11 TRUMPETER SWANS remain a fixture at Chaffey’s Lock and BALD
EAGLES are taking on the status of “junk birds” on Lake Opinicon where
they can be regularly seen. An EASTERN SCREECH-OWL made periodic
appearances at the Queen’s University Biological Station (QUBS) this
past week. Much to the delight of the winter bird ecology field course
participants currently visiting QUBS, it appears to have taken up a
territory there. BARRED OWLS can be heard most nights as they begin
singing in anticipation of the breeding season. A lone PINE SISKIN
visited the feeders at QUBS for one afternoon; they remain scarce in
the region. BROWN CREEPERS and a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH can be checked
off most days at QUBS. BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS have finally found their way
to Opinicon Road with flocks of up to 60 birds reported lately. There
is also at least one big flock of CEDAR WAXWINGS roaming the
countryside. A NORTHERN SHRIKE was at the intersection of Opinicon
Road and Queen’s University Road.

Prince Edward County
The aforementioned MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD has been reported as recently as
yesterday on Long Point Road on Long Point (aka Prince Edward Point).
Originally this bird was reported as a Townsend’s solitaire but was
subsequently confirmed to be a female mountain bluebird. Either way,
only a handful of records exist in the Kingston Region for both
species (though mountain bluebird is slightly rarer). Along with the
bluebird, one can find good numbers of AMERICAN ROBINS and CEDAR
WAXWNGS near Ducks Dive Charters. The other highlight for our area
this week was the pair of HARLEQUIN DUCKS seen offshore of the Prince
Edward Point Bird Observatory. Other waterfowl seen off the county
include GADWALL, GREATER SCAUP, BUFFLEHEAD and 2 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS.
Other notable birds include 1 NORTHERN GOSHAWK (Rock Crossroad) 1
MERLIN, 3 NORTHERN SHRIKES, 2 COMMON RAVENS, 2 NORTHERN FLICKERS (Rock
Crossroad), HORNED LARK, 5 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS (the first reported
for the Kingston Region this year) and 7 PURPLE FINCHES. Three BALD
EAGLES were at the Glenora Ferry.

Other sightings
A COOPER’S HAWK continues to depredate MOURNING DOVES at a Cranberry
Lake bird feeder. The same feeder is being visited by a female
RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER. A GREAT HORNED OWL was singing in Glenburnie
on the 13th. A SNOWY OWL remains north of the Millhaven Inn in
Millhaven.

Thank you to those who contributed observations this week. All bird
sightings reported to me are included in the Kingston Field
Naturalists’ long term records database which has over 60 years of
observations on file and is an invaluable conservation resource.

Mark

-- 
Mark Andrew Conboy
Operations & Research Assistant and Outreach Coordinator
Queen’s University Biological Station
280 Queen's University Road
Elgin, Ontario, Canada K0G 1E0
phone: 613-359-5629
fax: 613-359-6558
email: 7mc19 at queensu.ca or mconboy at lakeheadu.ca
QUBS website: http://www.queensu.ca/qubs/index.html
QUBS blog: http://opinicon.wordpress.com/
QUBS flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/qubsoutreach/




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